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Woodblock print by Katsukawa Shunsen

Price:  400,00

Original Japanese woodblock print by Katsukawa Shunsen (Shunkō II) 勝川春扇 (1762- circa 1830): five karako 唐子 (Chinese boys) in traditional garments at play in a snow covered garden, making an enormous snowball that is even larger then themselves. One of the boys is giggling in the corner being amazed of their own creation. Looking at the grey sky, snow is still falling, but they are protected by the branches of a large slanting pine tree. A long red fence surrounds the garden.

In a very good original condition with minimal traces of wear conform age. Placed in a passe-partout by two small pieces of tape. Please take a close look at the photos for a condition reference.

This impression lacks the artist’s signature at bottom left. Please compare with the impressions at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston: https://collections.mfa.org/objects/217090

and Five Colleges Collection Database: https://museums.fivecolleges.edu/detail.php?t=objects&type=ext&id_number=AC+1998.11

Date: Around 1810s
Type: Nishiki-e
Format: Horizontal oban
Signature & seal: none

Dimensions passe-partout:
Height 34.8 cm, Width 50 cm.
Dimensions wood block print:
Height 25.9 cm, Width 39 cm.

Katsukawa Shunsen (勝川 春扇), who is also known as Shunkō II, was a designer of books and ukiyo-e style Japanese woodblock prints. He was born in 1762 and designed prints from about 1805 to about 1821. He initially studied with the Rimpa school artist Tsutsumi Tōrin III. In 1806 or 1807, Shunsen became a student of Katsukawa Shun’ei, and changed his name from “Kojimachi Shunsen” to “Katsukawa Shunsen”. In 1820 he succeeded Katsukawa Shunkō I, becoming Katsukawa Shunkō II. In the late 1820s, he ceased producing woodblock prints and devoted himself to painting ceramics. He died about 1830. Shunsen is best known for his genre scenes, landscapes, and prints of beautiful women. (From Wikipedia)

When shipped we will add a certificate of authenticity.

Ref. No. : N2601

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